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Tomorrow at Seven

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Tomorrow at Seven


Published 1933
Topics Mystery


A mystery writer (Chester Morris) is determined to discover the identity of the "The Black Ace", a killer who always warns his intended victim, then leaves an ace of spades on the corpse as his calling card.


Run time 62 min.
Producer Samuel Zierler
Production Company Jefferson Pictures Corporation
Audio/Visual sound, black & white
Contact Information www.k-otic.com

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Reviews

Reviewer: picfixer - favoritefavoritefavorite - November 25, 2011
Subject: WARNING! FIRST PARAGRAPH SPOILER!
I watched this old dark house whodunit twice. The first time was for lazy enjoyment; the second was to see if the audience could uncover the killer with the clues at hand. Well, they could, even though there are plot holes related and unrelated to solving the mystery. One was inserted for dramatic effect and to provide misdirection. Two more important ones involve a physical impossibility, and a character's action which is seriously inconsistent with the plot. The writers sidestepped these and other issues by killing of the guilty person before how the murders were committed could be explained. However, all of this is irrelevant. Although you don't see the person's face or hear his name, the killer's identity is firmly established during the film's first two minutes.

I don't feel the slightest twinge of guilt over that spoiler. If "Tomorrow at Seven" doesn't amount to much as a whodunit, nevertheless it is a fun little movie which I thoroughly enjoyed. It nominally stars Chester Morris and Vivienne Osborne, but this really is an ensemble piece with a cast that includes Henry Stephenson, Grant Mitchell, Frank McHugh and Allen Jenkins. The latter two are onboard to provide comic relief as the world's dumbest cops. An unexpected little treat is the highly unlikely fistfight between Henry Stephenson and Ming the Merciless (Charles Middleton) Competently directed with good production values for a B-feature.

Marginal image quality. Good audio. Complete print.
Reviewer: billbarstad - favoritefavorite - October 27, 2009
Subject: No great shakes, Jake
Well, I'll be. A 1930s mystery/comedy that lets you figure it out. I kept waiting for a switch at the end. This one moves a little slowly, but I didn't get bored. The comedy team - the cops - kept it interesting for me. It could have been worse.

I downloaded the DivX file, which is really an AVI. Video was a little greenish at times and the bottom part of frames were cut off - noticeable in the title sequence. Audio had noise throughout, but it didn't interfere with understanding dialog. Otherwise, the audio and video were OK.
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